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World Press Photo: Nominated for the Joop Swart Masterclass

Thank you, Newsha Tavakolian for nominating me for this year’s World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. It is an honor and I am grateful.

Congrats as well to all other nominees.

UPDATE: Orwell wrote “Any life when viewed from the inside is simply a series of defeats.” That said, while sad I did not get it this year, grateful to Newsha Tavakolian for the nomination, everyone who has and continues to support my work and big congrats to all the talent who did. Take this and run with it.

Istiklal Caddesi, Istanbul

My heart to the victims, their friends and family as well as the people of Istanbul and Turkey after today’s suicide bombing on Istiklal Caddesi, Europe’s busiest street, a major pedestrian thoroughfare aligned with shops and restaurants that cuts through the heart of the Beyoglu district from Taksim Square to the ferry boat terminals of Karaköy. There are more bombings and senseless deaths today in the world than the imagination could have dreamt possible at the close of the last century. Often they occur far from home, but every day it seems they dream up new ways to manage to bring it ever closer to home, wherever home is. Some of us have seen our cities struck, our friends hurt, killed, maimed or disappeared into the abyss of wars and attacks of the age of terror. For me, Istiklal is close to home because it was home.

Images from my archive of Istiklal in better times showcase the avenue as at the center of political, social and economic life in Istanbul:

Nationalist demonstrators march after the lower house of the French parliament passed legislation making it a crime to deny genocide, a move specifically intended to bolster support among the large Armenian diaspora in France, on Istiklal Street in the Beyoglu neighborhood in Istanbul, Turkey on December 21, 2011.

Nationalist demonstrators march after the lower house of the French parliament passed legislation making it a crime to deny genocide, a move specifically intended to bolster support among the large Armenian diaspora in France, on Istiklal Street in the Beyoglu neighborhood in Istanbul, Turkey on December 21, 2011.

Nationalist demonstrators march up Istiklal Caddesi from Tunel in support of Ataturk's principles of a secular republic and against the ruling Justice and Development Party, AKP in Turkish, on Republic Day in Istanbul, Turkey on October 29, 2012.

Nationalist demonstrators march up Istiklal Caddesi from Tunel in support of Ataturk’s principles of a secular republic and against the ruling Justice and Development Party, AKP in Turkish, on Republic Day in Istanbul, Turkey on October 29, 2012.

Street cars and couples converge on Istiklal Caddesi in Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey on November 8, 2012.

Street cars and couples converge on Istiklal Caddesi in Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey on November 8, 2012.

Women are seen wearing bright red coats on Istiklal Caddesi in Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey on December 5, 2012.

Women are seen wearing bright red coats on Istiklal Caddesi in Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey on December 5, 2012.

People gather for Iftar dinner on newspapers on Istiklal Street in a show of solidarity with the demonstrators that had previously occupied Gezi Park at the start of Ramadan in Istanbul, Turkey on July 9, 2013.  Since demonstrators occupied Gezi Park for two and a half weeks last month, police have maintained a heavy presence in Taksim Square and periodic clashes have erupted as demonstrators have returned to the square in protest of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

People gather for Iftar dinner on newspapers on Istiklal Street in a show of solidarity with the demonstrators that had previously occupied Gezi Park at the start of Ramadan in Istanbul, Turkey on July 9, 2013. Since demonstrators occupied Gezi Park for two and a half weeks last month, police have maintained a heavy presence in Taksim Square and periodic clashes have erupted as demonstrators have returned to the square in protest of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Donald Trump, Jerry Springer + American Youth

Supporters of Republican Presidential front runner Donald Trump react to protesters during his speech at the Synergy Flight Center in Bloomington, Illinois on March 13, 2016.  Protests have become a regular feature of Donald Trump rallies, contributing in their way to the spectacle and circus-like environment.

Supporters of Republican Presidential front runner Donald Trump react to protesters during his speech at the Synergy Flight Center in Bloomington, Illinois on March 13, 2016. Protests have become a regular feature of Donald Trump rallies, contributing in their way to the spectacle and circus-like environment.

This image from Donald Trump’s rally in Bloomington, Illinois last Sunday was the moment my headache went through the roof and I left. Little boys film themselves taunting little girls who were being kicked out for protesting. This is a scary thing to witness when children turn against each other on the encouragement of an American presidential candidate. Today after successes in Florida, Illinois and Missouri but defeat in the critical state of Ohio to Governor John Kasich leaving open the prospect of a brokered convention, Trump threatened riots if he does not get the nomination. This is not maturity worthy of nuclear codes nor is promoting violence domestically presidential. The forces of politically motivated violence are being set in motion by a candidate whose campaign does not require him to leave the tarmac or answer questions from media beyond the scope of prearranged interviews. His rallies resemble “The Jerry Springer Show,” causing Springer himself to remark, “If they are going to do my show, they should start paying me… It’s disgraceful.”

International Women’s Day: Free Khadija Ismayilova!

Khadija Ismayilova, an investigative journalist and presenter on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty's Azeri-language internet-only station Azadliq Radiosu, is seen during a live broadcast at Azadliq Radiosu's studio in Baku, Azerbaijan on October 31, 2011.  In March 2012, Ismayilova received a black mail threat containing still images of her engaged in sexual intercourse on March 8, international women's day, if she did not cease her investigative reporting activities; one week later, a video on a dummy site made to look like that of the opposition party Musavat published a sex tape of her online while at the same time newspapers aligned with the government and the ruling New Azerbaijan Party, YAP by its Azerbaijani initials, ran editorials defaming her as a loose and sexually unhinged woman.

Khadija Ismayilova, an investigative journalist and presenter on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty’s Azeri-language internet-only station Azadliq Radiosu, is seen during a live broadcast at Azadliq Radiosu’s studio in Baku, Azerbaijan on October 31, 2011. In March 2012, Ismayilova received a black mail threat containing still images of her engaged in sexual intercourse on March 8, international women’s day, if she did not cease her investigative reporting activities; one week later, a video on a dummy site made to look like that of the opposition party Musavat published a sex tape of her online while at the same time newspapers aligned with the government and the ruling New Azerbaijan Party, YAP by its Azerbaijani initials, ran editorials defaming her as a loose and sexually unhinged woman.

Happy International Women’s Day! Time to remember an important one, Khadija Ismayilova, in jail, for being damn good at her job as an investigative reporter and raising mighty quantities of hell while investigating Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev and family’s shady business dealings. Turns out they are looting their country! I had the privilege to work with Khadija, be challenged by Khadija, and occasionally even bullied and reminded of moral courage and moral cowardice by Khadija. She is pure quality and intellect and she is serving a 7.5 year sentence for incitement to suicide by a boyfriend who has since recanted and was at the center of an effort at sexual blackmail against Khadija that occurred four years ago to this day with the arrival of a mysterious envelope postmarked Moscow and delivering contents reflecting pure KGB tactics. She went public, just a few months before Eurovision, so they retaliated by releasing a video on a mirror site made to look like one of the opposition parties, Musavat, who would of course have no interest in such a smear. Then the state news organs and papers of the Yeni, or New, Azerbaijan Party (YAP) official organs began publishing stories about how she was a loose women. Please no illusions about the ruling Aliyev clan and “modern” Azerbaijan. Khadija is a woman of courage, conviction, intelligence and she should be free! She inspires me!

Story of Khadija’s I was lucky enough to photograph:
Baku is Bulldozing Its Past,” EurasiaNet (April 27, 2012).

RIP, Ekrem Jevric

Sad to receive news that Ekrem Jevric, a viral video and Serbian “rijaliti” star of “Parovi,” died yesterday morning in America. Here he is last September in Belgrade singing me a turbofolk hit live on Serbian TV in what may have been one of the most surreal moments of my life. RIP.

(At center, in suit) Ekrem Jevric sings as Aleksandra Grdic gives a massage to a fellow cast member,  as Saska Karan laughs on the couch and turbofolk star Dusica Grabovic looks on in laughter on the set of "Parovi," which features many starlets, turbofolk viral video stars and others part of the blingy new money turbo world, in New Belgrade, Serbia on September 10, 2015.  Parovi is broadcast live twenty-four hours a day and along with shows like "Farm" and "Hotel Maldivi" populate the fodder for the tabloid press in Serbia.

(At center, in suit) Ekrem Jevric sings as Aleksandra Grdic gives a massage to a fellow cast member, as Saska Karan laughs on the couch and turbofolk star Dusica Grabovic looks on in laughter on the set of “Parovi,” which features many starlets, turbofolk viral video stars and others part of the blingy new money turbo world, in New Belgrade, Serbia on September 10, 2015. Parovi is broadcast live twenty-four hours a day and along with shows like “Farm” and “Hotel Maldivi” populate the fodder for the tabloid press in Serbia.