All posts tagged: world press photo

World Press Photo: Nominated for the Joop Swart Masterclass

Thank you, Newsha Tavakolian for nominating me for this year’s World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass. It is an honor and I am grateful. Congrats as well to all other nominees. UPDATE: Orwell wrote “Any life when viewed from the inside is simply a series of defeats.” That said, while sad I did not get it this year, grateful to Newsha Tavakolian for the nomination, everyone who has and continues to support my work and big congrats to all the talent who did. Take this and run with it.

The Importance of Memory and World Press Photo’s “Contemporary Issues”

“The struggle of man against power is the act of memory against forgetting.” -Milan Kundera, The Book of Laughter and Forgetting I have my own personal reasons for choosing to photograph over other mediums, for believing that we must look sometimes even when we are more often compelled not to. The collective memory of societies around the world relies on aesthetics, whether represented through flags, leaders, advertising and propaganda or news photographs. Only the last can claim to attempt to accurately reflect the conditions of all citizens but especially the disenfranchised, even if so often the focus is on podiums and the powerful. Earlier this month, World Press Photo announced the results of its annual competition. Shortly thereafter, the mayor of the Belgian city of Charleroi sent the Amsterdam-based foundation a letter stating his objections to an essay entitled “Dark Heart of Europe” that depicted his town as some sort of desolate sex-depraved locale where fetish and fantasy were expressions of current realities. Many of the scenes in the photographs were simply staged through a …

From the Archive: Same Scene, Only Two Years Later “Post-War”

In late July and early August I was traveling in Georgia, a post-Soviet state on the make, as part of my work following the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline route. Two years ago in 2008, the new nation-state was beset by misfortune in the form of invasion by its northerly neighbor, Russia. A short but devastating nine day war ensued in mid-August over the self-proclaimed independent republics of South Ossetia and Abkhazia in Georgia’s north and northwest. A primary theater in the armed conflict was the Georgian city of Gori, most famous as it is the birthplace of Iosef Dzughashvili, better known as Joseph Stalin who ruled the former Soviet Union with an iron first and a mass murderous streak from 1922 until his death in 1953. In some parts of the now former Eastern Bloc like Poland, de-Stalinzation did not occur until 1957, a year after Khrushchev’s “secret speech” at the Twentieth Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) renouncing the Soviet crimes of Stalinist excess. In 2008, several images from the Georgian …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Ed Ou on Finbarr O’Reilly

Waiting and Waiting for the Perfect Moment By KERRI MACDONALD September 22, 2010, 5:24 pm Ed Ou, 23, was born in Taiwan and grew up in Vancouver, Canada. He spent the last four years in the Middle East, Africa and the former Soviet Union. On June 13, his photographs of very young fighters accompanied “Children Carry Guns for a U.S. Ally, Somalia,” by Jeffrey Gettleman. Mr. Ou has been based in Nairobi as a photographer for Reportage by Getty Images and is soon to begin working as a photo intern at The Times. His remarks have been edited and condensed. Q. How was this picture taken? A. I was doing a story on victims of Soviet nuclear testing in Kazakhstan [“Under a Nuclear Cloud”] and I found this kid. His name is Nikita. He was 18 at the time. He can’t move. He was born with infant cerebral palsy due to radiation but he was one of the most animated people I’ve met. He could only move his head. He couldn’t control any of his …