All posts tagged: richard m. daley

The Year in Pictures 2011: Chicago, New York, New Jersey, Czech Republic, Azerbaijan and Turkey

The Year in Pictures 2011 The annus horribilis of 2011 is coming to a close – a year that will go down as one of dramatic upheaval and revolution alongside 1789, 1848, 1917, 1989, and now, this year. In Egypt, young revolutionaries overthrew the government of Hosni Mubarak after 31 years of subservience to a one-party state bolstered by an omnipresent muhabarata, or secret service, further bolstered by an overreaching military, after Egyptians witnessed similar events in Tunisia lead to the removal of that country’s former leader Ben Ali. Consequently, the domino theory made a surprise return as events in Egypt triggered revolts elsewhere in Bahrain, Libya, Syria and Yemen. Of these, only Libya’s leader fell after rebels received aerial support from NATO war planes; Qaddafi was found hiding in a drainage canal near his hometown of Sirte (or Surt, depending on your news source and spelling) and subsequently dragged through the streets, sodomized with a knife and otherwise tormented before being shot in the head. In the Libyan conflict three photographers lost their lives, …

Lucie Foundation International Photography Awards 2011 Honorable Mentions

I received three honorable mentions this year at the Lucie International Photography Awards for work in Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, Hungary, and Chicago. The entries are below with brief descriptions. You will have to scroll down pretty far in the same “Honorable Mention” gallery to find these entries in the environmental, political, photo essay and feature story categories here. From the entry description: Entry Title: “Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan Oil Pipeline” Name: Amanda Rivkin, United States Category: Professional, Photo Essay and Feature Story The Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan Oil Pipeline traverses three nations, skirts five conflict zones, and covers land held by believers in at least two of the world’s great religions. A major post-Cold War victory for the West that sent one million barrels of oil a day pumping from the oil fields of Azerbaijan with room to expand to transport energy from elsewhere in the Caspian and Central Asian regions, the BTC pipeline – as the project is known – has helped to redefine energy security in the early 21st century. (This work has previously appeared at National Geographic.) — …

Today in Chicago: Last Cabrini Green High-Rise Demolition Begins

In late 2007 and through early 2008, I spent several months following and photographing the Revolutionary Communists, a group based around the personality of Bob Avakian, a reclusive Armenian-American said last to be living in Paris. At the time, they lived at 1230 N. Burling, the last Cabrini Green high-rise building where demolition will begin today. The photo essay, “Plan for Transformation” borrows its title from the name of the urban renewal scheme devised by Mayor Richard M. Daley and the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) that would see the destruction of some of the largest public housing projects in the nation (at their inception the world) which were built under the leadership and direction of Mayor Richard M. Daley’s father Richard J. Daley during his 21-year tenure as mayor for life. Previously in Fortnight Journal, I wrote in an article entitled “The Chicago Way“: The outcome of the younger Daley’s “Plan for Transformation”–or, more accurately, the demolition of Chicago Housing Authority projects–would hand over large swaths of prime Chicago real estate on the Near North, …

Newsletter: AP26, Rahmbo replaces Daley, Chicago Mayoral Election Images, new photo journal

Newsletter just went out: Greetings!, A round-up of recents publications and news from Amanda Rivkin, photographer to kick off the springtime – because what says rebirth like a look back in time: AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY 26 The American Photography 26 photo annual arrived recently, featuring photographic highlights from 2009 in photojournalism, fine art and commercial photography. Included is this image I took (at left) from January 29, 2009 of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in the Illinois State Capitol his final day in office for The New York Times: More on American Photography 26 both on the AI-AP website and the amanda rivkin, photographer blog. RAHM EMANUEL IS OUR NEW DALEY On February 22, 2011, Chicago got a new mayor – a rare, once-in-a-generation event if someone named Daley was in power at the time of your birth, growth or development. For the first time in more than 21 years and after nearly half a century of Daley family-rule at the helm of Chicago politics, a new mayor was anointed: Rahm Emanuel. Receiving 55% of the …

Fortnight Journal: The Chicago Way

The Chicago Way Fortnight Journal February 14, 2011 I. The Chicago Tribune arrived on the ledge outside my family’s kitchen. It was December. I was home for the holidays from graduate school. On the front page, the Tribune featured an early poll of 721 likely voters in the Chicago mayoral race. This was the first real contest in 21 years for the highest office in the city; The Fifth Floor; the mayor’s executive suite at Chicago City Hall. The poll showed a clear and early divide had emerged: There was Rahm Emanuel. And then there was everyone else. Or rather, there was Rahm Emanuel with a double-digit, 32 percent lead, and then a fragmented spread that delegated mere single-digit percentage points to the other six candidates, in alphabetical order: Roland Burris, Gery Chico, Danny Davis, Miguel del Valle, Reverend James Meeks and Carol Moseley Braun. As of this writing, the race has dwindled considerably. Davis and Meeks bowed out and endorsed Moseley Braun, making her the de facto black candidate in the race. Burris announced …

From the Archive: Small Acts of Civil Disobedience Together Can Make a Big Noise

“Any government that treats its people as the property of the state cannot be tolerated.” – Adam Michnik at the New York Public Library in conversation, “Revolution: A User’s Manual” April 29, 2006 As demonstrations in both Tunisia, which successfully toppled the regime of Zine Al Abidine Ben Ali, and the ongoing siege on the streets of Egyptian cities where the government of (likely) outgoing dictator (sorry, Joe Biden) Hosni Mubarak have shown, small acts of civil disobedience together can make a big noise. From the archive, small acts of civil disobedience. Desmond Lane, 11, with his father, Darick Lane, 38, opponents of the death penalty, during a prayer vigil near the entrance to the Greensville Correctional Center in Jarratt, Va. hours before the 9 p.m. execution of John Allen Muhammad, the so-called “Washington sniper” responsible for gunning down 10 and wounding three in the D.C.-area in 2002, on November 10, 2009. Gov. Tim Kaine refused to grant a stay of clemency and the U.S. Supreme Court turned down the request for a stay of …

From the Archive: Two Years Ago Almost to the Day, Former and Present White House Chief of Staffs Rahm Emanuel and William Daley at Obama’s Inauguration Luncheon

Obama’s former Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, who left the position to run for mayor of Chicago following Richard M. Daley’s surprise announcement not to run for reelection after 21 years, and Mayor Daley’s brother, William Daley, Barack Obama’s newly appointed Chief of Staff at the Inauguration luncheon in Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2009.

The Full Emanuel: Running with Rahmbo, Best Pictures from the Last Few Days of Campaign Coverage

Rahm Emanuel is running for mayor of Chicago. Since 1989, change around the world inaugurated the Daley regime in Chicago, as in Richard M. For the past 21 years, Chicago had a mayor for life – until of course Daley announced this past fall that he did not plan to seek reelection. Before Richard M. Daley, there was his father, Richard J. Daley, also known as “the old man,” who controlled the city in much the similar fashion as the son has for 21 years, until his death which ushered in an interregnum until Chicago settled for his son less than two decades later. But the floodgates have now opened up; politicians once retired emerged, congressmen threw their hats in, the White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel resigned to come home and run, and then his tenant refused to surrender the house and threw his hat into the ring too. Then Rahm’s residency was challenged presenting a problem because Illinois state law says one must have resided in the state for the year prior …

Rahm Emanuel Residency Hearing

If there is any photojournalistic exercise in the gymnastics of Chicago politics (or any assignment for that matter), it is finding that angle, that moment, or that scoop no one else has. My biggest coup to this end on the Chicago politics beat was when The New York Times helped secure exclusive access to former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich during his impeachment proceedings on January 29, 2009. But the show must go on. Rahm Emanuel raises his right hand before testifying at his residency hearing concerning his eligibility to run for mayor of Chicago in a basement Chicago Board of Elections conference room in Chicago, Ill. on December 14, 2010. And for some highlights from the day, courtesy of my old high school friend Eric Johnson, now a stringer for Reuters here in Chicago: Shown photographs of his North Side home largely emptied of furniture, Emanuel identified various rooms and then jabbed at his interlocutor when asked to identify the kitchen. “Very good Mr. Odelson. You pass U.S. history for $200,” Emanuel joked. […] Outgoing …

Newsletter: [Subject Line Should Read] Verve Photo / Holiday Print Sale / CHICAGO!

Newsletter went out today, sadly, sigh, with a mistaken subject line that ought have read “Verve Photo / Holiday Print Sale / CHICAGO!” Hopefully the fact that it accidentally went out with the last newsletter subject line will not deter folks because this has some new images from Azerbaijan and Rahm Emanuel on the campaign trail for Chicago mayor that have not been seen before: First off, happy holidays to one and all! Some recent news, updates and events… VERVE PHOTO Today on Verve Photo, Geoffrey Hiller’s popular photo industry blog, one of my images from my work following the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline route last summer is featured: From the story behind the image: “The group of people who took me to this beach were Bakuvian urban elites, a banker, a PhD student in Germany, among others who had professional jobs that ensured that when they went to the beach it was more private, less polluted and in turn more expensive. It was a strange site, the two groups representing the two Azerbaijans. The fact …