All posts tagged: protests

Corbis News Pictures of the Year 2015

An image of mine from Chicago’s Black Friday protests on Michigan Avenue, Chicago’s “Magnificent Mile” and longest shopping street, following the release of a dashcam video of police shooting Laquan McDonald is included in the best news pictures of the year selected by my agency, Corbis Images. You can view the entire gallery on their website.

Best of 2015: Chicago, Poland, Serbia and Germany

This was a year of terrorist attacks, mass shootings a-plenty, mass exodus from the Middle East, North and East Africa and the AfPak region which does not include India but a small number from Bangladesh, rising xenophobic far right sentiment, and an uptick in hostility towards Muslims unprecedented since immediately after the September 11, 2001 attacks. The far right so far has been kept on the back burner, but the slow slide into what I liken to the Brezhnev years of the Cold War for the Global War on Terror (GWoT) years is upon us. The American presidential elections offer little reason or occasion for hope. The state of affairs in Syria, too, offers little occasion for hope. “Assad must go” has converted into the new “red line,” as US Secretary of State John Kerry concedes Assad can stay because the US has no one else to pluck out of an abyss of alternatives. The whole world has heard of the Islamic State and the international media relishes any opportunity to put the group’s name …

New Work: Maidan Heroes

“I first came here when students were on strike in favor of the association agreement with the European Union. I was here the night students were beaten but I left at midnight to sleep, but when I heard they were beaten I had a new reason to protest on the Maidan. Two days later, City Hall was occupied and I worked in the kitchen and then I moved up to working with the commanders. Then when it started on Hrushevsky Street in January, I was bringing tea and cookies to the demonstrators. Then when the Ukraine House was occupied, I started working in the press center. Of course Yanukovych is responsible for this. I don’t know who else is responsible, but I know Yanukovych has already been punished. I want honest authorities. Right now we can see changes of faces, but I want new faces. People are awake now but of course there is still ignorance and people who are not supporting Maidan. I want awareness.” -Yulia, 18 From February 18-20, 2014, the Maidan Square …

2013 Poynter Fellowship at Yale University

A few months back, I was notified that I was named the recipient of a Poynter Fellowship at Yale University to give a talk this fall on my work photographing “Protests, Pipelines + Women” in Turkey and Azerbaijan at Yale University. I will be joined by economics professor Tolga Koker. The talk is sponsored by the University’s Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. The date is now set for October 1, 2013 at 4pm in Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue, Yale University. The talk is free and open to the public. More information is available on the Yale University website. Yale Daily News article, “Photojournalist Discusses Travels, Gender“.

From the Archive: Small Acts of Civil Disobedience Together Can Make a Big Noise

“Any government that treats its people as the property of the state cannot be tolerated.” – Adam Michnik at the New York Public Library in conversation, “Revolution: A User’s Manual” April 29, 2006 As demonstrations in both Tunisia, which successfully toppled the regime of Zine Al Abidine Ben Ali, and the ongoing siege on the streets of Egyptian cities where the government of (likely) outgoing dictator (sorry, Joe Biden) Hosni Mubarak have shown, small acts of civil disobedience together can make a big noise. From the archive, small acts of civil disobedience. Desmond Lane, 11, with his father, Darick Lane, 38, opponents of the death penalty, during a prayer vigil near the entrance to the Greensville Correctional Center in Jarratt, Va. hours before the 9 p.m. execution of John Allen Muhammad, the so-called “Washington sniper” responsible for gunning down 10 and wounding three in the D.C.-area in 2002, on November 10, 2009. Gov. Tim Kaine refused to grant a stay of clemency and the U.S. Supreme Court turned down the request for a stay of …

From the Archive: The Week the World Took to the Streets a Reflection on the Initial and Subsequent Revisions of History and Other Manifestations

This week the world took to the streets. One third of gas stations across France were dry because of fuel blockades initiated by unions and executed by students and other rabble-rousers to protest Nicolas Sarkozy’s attempts to raise the retirement age from 60 to 62. In Greece, students objected to austerity measures in an effort to get Greece’s spiraling deficits and debts from becoming even more out of control. On the Western or American front, however, it was pretty quiet. A chance to reflect on the amendments history has made to our own demonstrations, police riots, anarchist takeovers, call it what you will. As a native Chicagoan, no single event meets the category of this historical revisions than the 1968 Democratic National Convention, which depending on your perspective was a counterculture takeover or a police riot. In 2009, 41 years after the fact several law enforcement veterans of the collision decided to hold a reunion on the pretext of fundraising for the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police. They ordered pizza, they maybe drank a few …