All posts tagged: lens blog

The New York Times Lens Blog: Pictured – A World At 7 Billion

Pictured: A World at 7 Billion The New York Times Lens Blog December 7, 2011, 5:00 am By KERRI MACDONALD Here it is: A visual time capsule, capturing our world at seven billion people — and counting. Below, you’ll find a virtual quilt that weaves together about 400 of the more than 1,000 photographs we received. There is little rhyme or reason to the order you see. We sought a mega-snapshot of our world — different regions, subjects, viewpoints. There is a serendipitous beauty in the chaos. What will these photos tell the future generation — including some of the newborns who were photographed by Lynsey Addario on Oct. 31 — about our world? Explore the gallery using the search box just below this text. Browse by name, location, or — if you want to get creative — randomly, by word. One of our most successful searches was “hope,” which brings together the optimism we found in so many pictures. […] View my image, “A Dissident Remarries,” featured as #3 of 390 images submitted by …

To Borrow a Title, Revolution: A User’s Manual

In 2006, I attended an event at the New York Public Library, “Revolution: A User’s Manual,” with Adam Michnik, Baltasar Garzon, Giaconda Belli and G.M. Tamas and moderated by Christopher Hitchens. It was my first encounter with Michnik; we would meet again a year and a half later one October day in his Warsaw office to discuss German MP Erika Steinbach’s efforts to build a Center Against Expulsions in Berlin and the prickly question of monuments and historical memory. A partial reading, watching and listening list relevant to the craft of revolution since the manuals are being rewritten yet again. Links to source material from this and past revolutions is provided when available free and online: 60 Minutes/CBS News, “Wael Ghonim and Egypt’s New Age Revolution.” Airdate: February 13, 2011. Al Jazeera English, “Egyptian Actor Supports the Protesters.” Airdate: February 1, 2011. “They think they can hijack 85 million voices saying ‘enough.’” – Khalid Abo Al-Naga The Atlantic Tumblr, “The Most Subversive Protest of All: An Egyptian Protestor [sic] Kisses a Riot Police Officer.” January …

Michael Shaw of BAGnewsNotes’ Top 10 Visual Politics/Photojournalism Blogs List

Michael Shaw is “the publisher of the popular progressive blog, BAGnewsNotes. BNN is the only blog dedicated 100% to visual politics and the analysis of news images, and also features original, politically-oriented images from America’s pre-eminent photojournalists.” Included on his list of the “top 10 visual politics/photojournalism blogs” for Blogs.com is Verve Photo and a link to recent work featured on the site by Amanda Rivkin. Also included on the list is The New York Times Lens blog, where I co-created and contributed a series of 13 interviews with young photographers last year for the “Turning Point” series that asked about an image that served as a source of inspiration and an image by each photographer that represented a turning point in their early careers. In addition to being featured in this series on the Lens blog, “Turning Point: Images That Inspire,” my work was also highlighted in “Must See: Images on the Web” and “Showcase: New President, Old Problems (2009 – The Year in Pictures)”. Additional blogs listed in Shaw’s top ten include No …

Adding Islam to a Latino Identity, Photographs on The New York Times Lens Blog By Eirini Vourloumis

My good friend Eirini Vourloumis has work featured on The New York Times Lens blog today, “Adding Islam to a Latino Identity,” that includes 19 slides of Latino Muslim life in the New York suburbs. From her interview with Lens editor and New York Times staff photographer Jim Estrin: Q. What got you started documenting Muslim life in America? A.My interest in Islam began after the attacks of Sept. 11, as I was interested in how the event affected the daily lives of Muslims in New York. Personally, I was interested in exploring Islam because my mother’s family is Muslim, from Indonesia. Being raised in Athens and baptized Greek Orthodox, I was never exposed to the religion. I desired to learn more about my mother’s culture, using photography as my guide. Q. Is it different being Muslim in America than in other countries? A. The main difference is that in America, Muslim society does not have a homogeneous ethnic identity. There are communities of different cultures and backgrounds that embrace Islam. This creates an layered …

Holiday Print Sale, FotoWeek DC, Fortnight Journal, Turning Point Concludes

Newsletter went out yesterday afternoon: Greetings! I would like to announce a holiday print sale of a select series of 17 prints for $75 each. Every print is from a 6 x 10 inch file and is printed on 8 x 10 inch paper and students who order from a .edu e-mail account receive a discounted price of $50. The holiday print sale is to fundraise for my upcoming trip to Hungary to cover the aftermath of the alumina industrial accident in Ajka that sent toxic red sludge pouring into neighboring villages when an industrial reservoir ruptured. VIEW THE 17 PRINTS FOR $75 to order: send a request that specifies which print and includes your name and mailing address to amanda.rivkin@gmail.com. — Two of my fellow Sarah Lawrence alums, Samantha Hinds and Adam Whitney Nichols, launched Fortnight Journal an online literary journal of art, prose and contemporary culture. VIEW SLOVENSKO FOR FORTNIGHT JOURNAL to see my first of six contributions. — The New York Times Lens Blog “Turning Point” series concluded last week after showcasing …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Yana Paskova on Henri Cartier-Bresson

Yana Paskova on Henri Cartier-Bresson By KERRI MACDONALD AND AMANDA RIVKIN August 25, 2010 12:00pm Yana Paskova, 28, was born in Bulgaria, raised in Chicago and is now based in New York. She has worked across the United States and in Eastern Europe, Russia and Asia. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, The Chicago Tribune and Time Magazine. Amanda Rivkin’s conversation with Ms. Paskova has been edited and condensed. Q. How was this picture taken? A. This photo was originally meant to be a part of a square-format portrait project, but remained in my general campaign work long after the idea. I took this photo in the summer of 2007, an opaque moment when it came to predicting who would become the next president of the U.S. Until the brief instant Hillary Clinton stepped under the shadows of a tree to talk with potential supporters, I had filled a long day of campaign events chasing any facial expression or moment that would birth some sort of different photo. But with the …