All posts tagged: kerri macdonald

To Borrow a Title, Revolution: A User’s Manual

In 2006, I attended an event at the New York Public Library, “Revolution: A User’s Manual,” with Adam Michnik, Baltasar Garzon, Giaconda Belli and G.M. Tamas and moderated by Christopher Hitchens. It was my first encounter with Michnik; we would meet again a year and a half later one October day in his Warsaw office to discuss German MP Erika Steinbach’s efforts to build a Center Against Expulsions in Berlin and the prickly question of monuments and historical memory. A partial reading, watching and listening list relevant to the craft of revolution since the manuals are being rewritten yet again. Links to source material from this and past revolutions is provided when available free and online: 60 Minutes/CBS News, “Wael Ghonim and Egypt’s New Age Revolution.” Airdate: February 13, 2011. Al Jazeera English, “Egyptian Actor Supports the Protesters.” Airdate: February 1, 2011. “They think they can hijack 85 million voices saying ‘enough.’” – Khalid Abo Al-Naga The Atlantic Tumblr, “The Most Subversive Protest of All: An Egyptian Protestor [sic] Kisses a Riot Police Officer.” January …

Holiday Print Sale, FotoWeek DC, Fortnight Journal, Turning Point Concludes

Newsletter went out yesterday afternoon: Greetings! I would like to announce a holiday print sale of a select series of 17 prints for $75 each. Every print is from a 6 x 10 inch file and is printed on 8 x 10 inch paper and students who order from a .edu e-mail account receive a discounted price of $50. The holiday print sale is to fundraise for my upcoming trip to Hungary to cover the aftermath of the alumina industrial accident in Ajka that sent toxic red sludge pouring into neighboring villages when an industrial reservoir ruptured. VIEW THE 17 PRINTS FOR $75 to order: send a request that specifies which print and includes your name and mailing address to amanda.rivkin@gmail.com. — Two of my fellow Sarah Lawrence alums, Samantha Hinds and Adam Whitney Nichols, launched Fortnight Journal an online literary journal of art, prose and contemporary culture. VIEW SLOVENSKO FOR FORTNIGHT JOURNAL to see my first of six contributions. — The New York Times Lens Blog “Turning Point” series concluded last week after showcasing …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Kirsten Luce on Ami Vitale

Finding Pictures When You’re Not Looking By KERRI MACDONALD AND AMANDA RIVKIN October 27, 2010, 3:39 pm Kirsten Luce, a 28-year-old photographer living in Brooklyn, is a regular contributor to The New York Times. She spent two years photographing along the Mexican border and has freelanced in Mexico City and Atlanta. She is the coordinator for the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop, a nonprofit program for emerging photojournalists. Amanda Rivkin’s conversation with Ms. Luce has been edited. Q. Where and how was this picture taken? A. It was taken at a ranch in rural northeastern Mexico. I was living in McAllen, Tex., on the Mexican border, and I was invited to watch a bullfighting practice session. This young matador-in-training was suited up and anxious to begin, but the rest of the men involved were taking their time, socializing. I think it’s important to document everyday life along the border. With the violence occurring in the region, we see a steady stream of dramatic imagery. It is easy to forget that the border is home to millions of …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Peter van Agtmael on Mark Steinmetz

A Large Worldview From Small Details By KERRI MACDONALD AND AMANDA RIVKIN October 20, 2010, 12:30 pm Peter van Agtmael, who is represented by Magnum Photos, has spent the last four years documenting America at war. In 2006, his work from Iraq won second place in the general news category from World Press Photo. His book, “2nd Tour, Hope I Don’t Die,” was described on Lens (Nov. 3, 2009). His conversation with Amanda Rivkin has been edited and condensed. Q. How was this picture taken? And how has it changed the way you work? A. It was taken on my second trip to the Three Gorges Dam. It hasn’t really changed the way I work. It was just one of many different moments of happiness and satisfaction toward photography I’ve encountered along the way; just a particularly potent one at the time. I wouldn’t be very excited if I took that picture now, but that’s a good thing. Inspiration: Mark Steinmetz Image: “Knoxville, Tenn.” Early 1990s. Q. When did you first come upon this image? …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Matt Eich on Rich-Joseph Facun

Finding Clarity in Ambiguity By KERRI MACDONALD AND AMANDA RIVKIN October 13, 2010, 1:30 pm Matt Eich, a freelance photographer based in Norfolk, Va., is a founding member of Luceo Images. Mr. Eich, who was born in 1986, focuses on the sense of identity found within communities. This year, he was named one of PDN’s 30 emerging photographers to watch. He has also received awards from Pictures of the Year International. His conversation with Amanda Rivkin has been condensed. Q. How was this picture taken? A. I was in Amsterdam for the Joop Swart Masterclass last November. It had been a week of crazy discussions with photographers from around the world who all speak a slightly different version of this visual language. You could always get interpretations of your work and ways to view your work. We were all sort of reeling from these conversations we had been having. Toward the end of the week, we all went out to a bar and I snapped a few pictures, one of the back of this guy’s …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Justin Maxon on Antoine D’Agata

Multiple Realities, Multiple Exposures By KERRI MACDONALD October 6, 2010, 1:55 pm Justin Maxon was born in California in 1983 and attended San Francisco State University. In 2007, at 24, Mr. Maxon won first prize in the World Press Photo Daily Life category. Two years later, in 2009, PDN called him one of 30 emerging photographers. Mr. Maxon’s conversation with Kerri MacDonald has been edited and condensed for space. Q. How was this picture taken? A. While working on a long-term project in Chester, a small town outside of Philadelphia, I was besieged in witnessing issues weighing on the lives of the community. I grew frustrated that my work didn’t have the dimension or complexity I felt was necessary to unfold the overlapping issues. So I took a bold leap and began experimenting with multiple exposures. Placing interrelated moments next to each other, I attempted to create images that had layers of understanding in them, where one could see more of the true complications of life in Chester. People must endure a tremendous amount of …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Mustafah Abdulaziz on Richard Avedon

Finding Reality, Through a Lens By KERRI MACDONALD AND AMANDA RIVKIN September 29, 2010, 3:23 pm The Brooklyn-based photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz, 24, was born in New York City. Mr. Abdulaziz, who works as a contract photographer for The Wall Street Journal, has been a member of the photo collective MJR since 2008. His work focuses on people and cultures in transition. In 2009, Mr. Abdulaziz was named one of Magenta Foundation’s Emerging Photographers, and this year he was nominated for young photographer at the International Center of Photography’s Infinity Awards. His conversation with Amanda Rivkin has been edited and condensed for space. Q. How was this picture taken? A. The Mural Arts Program of Philadelphia commissioned me to do a series of portraits during the installation of a mural on the side of a methadone clinic in North Philadelphia. People who were on methadone worked on the mural — some contributing poetry and writing for the muralist, James Burns; others putting it together in the basement of the clinic. This portrait of Peggy was taken …