All posts tagged: iraq

Two Great Exhibits in New York as the 10th Anniversary of the Invasion of Iraq Approaches

Two great exhibits featuring work by two VII photographers, Franco Pagetti and Gary Knight, are opening in New York City next week. I will be in New York next week and hope to make it to both. Jamie Wellford, formerly of Newsweek, one of my favorite people and finest photo editors helped curate Pagetti’s show at the VII Gallery. Here are the details for both shows: Flashback, Iraq by Franco Pagetti March 12 – April 12, 2013 VII Gallery Brooklyn, NY Photographer Franco Pagetti arrived in Iraq three months before the American bombs fell on March 19, 2003. Photographing under the watchful eye of Saddam’s minders and secret police proved to be easier than what followed. Journalists would soon need the protection of armed men and a chase car and, by 2005, even that become prohibitive. Violence spiraled out of control with daily bombings and kidnapping threats. The only way to cover the story was to be surrounded by even more men with guns, that is, to be embedded with the American military. Amidst these …

The Year in Pictures 2011: Chicago, New York, New Jersey, Czech Republic, Azerbaijan and Turkey

The Year in Pictures 2011 The annus horribilis of 2011 is coming to a close – a year that will go down as one of dramatic upheaval and revolution alongside 1789, 1848, 1917, 1989, and now, this year. In Egypt, young revolutionaries overthrew the government of Hosni Mubarak after 31 years of subservience to a one-party state bolstered by an omnipresent muhabarata, or secret service, further bolstered by an overreaching military, after Egyptians witnessed similar events in Tunisia lead to the removal of that country’s former leader Ben Ali. Consequently, the domino theory made a surprise return as events in Egypt triggered revolts elsewhere in Bahrain, Libya, Syria and Yemen. Of these, only Libya’s leader fell after rebels received aerial support from NATO war planes; Qaddafi was found hiding in a drainage canal near his hometown of Sirte (or Surt, depending on your news source and spelling) and subsequently dragged through the streets, sodomized with a knife and otherwise tormented before being shot in the head. In the Libyan conflict three photographers lost their lives, …

Interview with Dan Reimold of College Media Matters for Forthcoming Journalism Text Book

Recently, a query from Dan Reimold of College Media Matters/University of Tampa landed in my inbox, requesting an interview for a forthcoming journalism text book he is working on now that will offer advice and experience from journalists. With his permission, I am publishing the contents of our online interview, which was conducted from July 1-5, 2011: DAN REIMOLD. What are the best pieces of advice you have received or given about capturing quality photos? AMANDA RIVKIN. Most of the best macro-level advice I have received has been from photographers-turned-editors like Santiago Lyon, the Director of Photography at The Associated Press, who has spoken to me and many, many other young photographers about the difference between taking pictures and making a picture and thinking about the frames you are taking as opposed to merely clicking away. Other photographers have undoubtedly helped along the way and too many to name, but the best advice I have found is only pertinent when it is later engrained in experience. AR. The one time I talked with photographer Chris …

Thesis Bibliography: The Relationship Between the Military and Media in a Time of War – Three Case Studies (Second World War, Vietnam, Post-September 11 Conflicts) of America in Multi-Year Conflicts

(NOTE: An updated bibliography and account, “How to Write A Graduate Thesis on Military-Media Relations in the USA! in 120 Days” posted April 14, 2011.) Over the next five months, I will dedicate no small part of my time to the task of studying the relationship of the U.S. military and the American media during a time of war. I will examine three case studies of multi-year involvement in foreign conflict from the Second World War and Vietnam era to the present, post-September 11 conflicts. My work will first be collected towards my thesis in the Security Studies program at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. I hope to also see the work evolve into a magazine article. I will amend this list periodically as my bibliography expands. I also hope to collect numerous interviews with current practitioners, editors, communications managers, and military public affairs officers relevant to the study of the relationship between the military and the media as possible between then and now. Historical Rise of the Modern War Correspondent Goldstein, Robert …

The Year in Pictures 2010: United States, Cuba, Slovakia, Azerbaijan, Turkey and Hungary

The Year in Pictures 2010 by Amanda Rivkin available on PhotoShelter Archive. Images from the year include: Gitmo USA – the prison site designated for Guantanamo Bay detainees after the prison’s closure in rural Illinois that never quite opened because the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay has not yet closed. Portrait of William Fiedler, Owner of the Gallery Bookstore, Chicago – My former boss at one of the North Side’s finest used book stores. Injured Veteran – Portrait of Michael Jernigan, injured in Fallujah, Iraq in 2004; photographed at The Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia. Baltasar Garzon – Former examining magistrate of Spain’s Criminal Court, extraordinarily controversial for execution of the practice of universal justice and far-reaching indictments of foreign leaders and terrorist organizations; photographed at the Instituto Cervantes in Chicago. Afghan Bowling Tournament (3 images) – Afghan-American bowling tournament in Annandale, Virginia. Cuba (8 images) – The Second Age of Castro, published on ForeignPolicy.com and The New York Times “Week in Review”. Spectacular Slovakia (13 images) – Weddings, floods, world cup, trains, planes, castles, …

Cablegate Continued: The System Is Watching and Other Sordid Tales From the Day’s Affairs of State

Accessing the WikiLeaks site has gotten difficult, if not impossible now despite mirror sites and domain names registered at last check in France, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. However, those that visit the site undoubtedly receive a malware infection pretty fast. Similar tactics took down The Guardian’s website yesterday when it attempted to host a live, online chat with WikiLeaks founder, Interpol fugitive, and known loon, Julian Assange. I hate to ask an obvious question of Mr. Assange, but how does he expect a nation-state, a superpower notably to react? If he gets away with it, so can anyone and the United States of America cannot have that. Joking aside, there is a serious, massive question of what to do with Mr. Assange, how to prosecute him, all the while keeping in mind he may have made himself into a willing martyr of the data revolution and that the U.S. arsenal includes everything from drones to nuclear weapons, neither of which will be used in this case given the strategic predicament. To date, there has been …

The New York Times Lens Blog Turning Point Series: Ayman Oghanna on Alex Webb

Changed by a Car Bomb in Baghdad By KERRI MACDONALD AND AMANDA RIVKIN September 1, 2010, 12:00 pm Ayman Oghanna, 25, a multimedia journalist, was born and raised in London. He studied at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and is currently based in Iraq. His conversation with Amanda Rivkin has been edited and condensed for clarity. Q.How was this picture taken? How has it changed the way you work? A.I took this photo after a suicide car bomb exploded across the street from where I was staying in Baghdad. Technically or aesthetically, it wasn’t taken with any special approach or concept. I just went out and tried to capture reality. I included it, however, because it marks an important moment. It sealed my commitment to this medium. At that point I had been in Baghdad for a few months on my own as a freelancer. It can be a miserable place. I had grown increasingly frustrated with working there. It’s a difficult country to operate in, especially freelance, and the news interest isn’t there …