All posts tagged: georgetown university

The Year in Pictures 2011: Chicago, New York, New Jersey, Czech Republic, Azerbaijan and Turkey

The Year in Pictures 2011 The annus horribilis of 2011 is coming to a close – a year that will go down as one of dramatic upheaval and revolution alongside 1789, 1848, 1917, 1989, and now, this year. In Egypt, young revolutionaries overthrew the government of Hosni Mubarak after 31 years of subservience to a one-party state bolstered by an omnipresent muhabarata, or secret service, further bolstered by an overreaching military, after Egyptians witnessed similar events in Tunisia lead to the removal of that country’s former leader Ben Ali. Consequently, the domino theory made a surprise return as events in Egypt triggered revolts elsewhere in Bahrain, Libya, Syria and Yemen. Of these, only Libya’s leader fell after rebels received aerial support from NATO war planes; Qaddafi was found hiding in a drainage canal near his hometown of Sirte (or Surt, depending on your news source and spelling) and subsequently dragged through the streets, sodomized with a knife and otherwise tormented before being shot in the head. In the Libyan conflict three photographers lost their lives, …

June Newsletter: National Geographic publishes BTC pipeline / Fulbright to Azerbaijan

This is a pretty special newsletter for me concerning announcements. First, I have graduated from the Georgetown University Graduate School of Foreign Service, which ends a two-year chapter of my life first in Washington, DC and then commuting between there and New York over the past year. While it was a fascinating educational experience, I am ready to move on to new projects and pastures. As a photographer, my work grew as well over those two years, for me most notably last summer when I was a recipient of a National Geographic Young Explorers Grant which facilitated travel photographing the social and economic life along the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline which delivers Caspian crude to the Mediterranean port of Ceyhan by way of Azerbaijan, Georgia and Turkey. Recently, this work was published on the National Geographic website in a photo gallery entitled, “At Five Years, BTC Pipeline Moves Oil, Culture,” with accompanying text by Marianne Lavelle. Lastly, the biggest bit of news. As a consequence of this work and my interest in the people, culture and …

Press Release: Amanda Rivkin Receives U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship

U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs 2011 Critical Language Scholarships for Intensive Summer Institutes PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: James A. Lawrence Date: May 12, 2011 Telephone: 202-632-3241 Amanda Rivkin Receives U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship Amanda Rivkin of Georgetown University has been awarded a U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) to study Azerbaijani in Azerbaijan during the summer of 2011. Amanda Rivkin is among the approximately 575 U.S. undergraduate and graduate students who received a scholarship from the U.S. Department of State’s CLS Program to study Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla/Bengali, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Indonesian, Japanese, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Turkish, or Urdu languages. U.S. students will spend seven to ten weeks in intensive language institutes this summer in 14 countries where these languages are spoken. The CLS Program provides fully-funded, group-based intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences. CLS Program participants are expected to continue their language study beyond the scholarship and apply their critical language skills in their future professional careers. The 2011 CLS Program …

Postcards from the USA! Images from the Last Week in the USA!

Last week, was a busy one. Rahm Emanuel was inaugurated mayor of Chicago and I graduated from Georgetown University’s Graduate School of Foreign Service. I drove 2,000 miles between here, there and several other places in between. From the corn fields in the plains of the Midwest, to the backyard patios of Brooklyn, to the gates of the highest office in the land. It all ends just before the rapture that was said to end the world but did not manage to. Some postcards from the last week:

How to Write a Graduate Student Thesis on Military-Media Relations in the USA! in 120 Days

(Plagiarizers, be forewarned mine is already officially submitted to the Georgetown Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and yours will only be an imitation at best and at worst get you in really, really big trouble with the man either now or later in life. See: former German Defense Minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg.) Photojournalists like to create what are called “gear posts” whereby they empty the contents of their backpack and dutifully record each and every item down to the essence and origin of even the lint in the lining (“specially made in Nepal” or “hair from a lamb we slaughtered in Sudan”). I have no intention of doing any such thing, because I imagine most of you would probably be correct to assume that I wear a scarf with a bit of perfume on it (protective against offensive odors), and carry a whole bunch of lenses and batteries (for making pictures and ensuring I do not run out of power in the process), and other things too like cameras, notebooks, water. With that accomplished …

Margaret Bourke White’s Second World War

Margaret Bourke White is the ultimate trailblazer of a female war correspondent. She both wrote and photographed, owned the first ever cover of Life magazine with one of her images, and was the first ever woman to be outfitted as a GI in the U.S. Army in order to cover the Second World War’s European fronts. She is the author of They Called It “Purple Heart Valley”, an occasionally (alright, often) sentimental account of her experiences as a correspondent in the Second World War. Luckily, Georgetown’s copy is a first edition that includes a note on the copyright page “About the Appearance of Books in Wartime,” stating “A recent ruling by the War Production Board has curtailed the use of paper by book publishers in 1944. In line with this ruling and in order to conserve materials and manpower, we are co-operating by: 1. Using lighter-weight paper, which reduces the bulk of our books substantially. 2. Printing books with smaller margins and with more words to each page. Result fewer pages per book. Slimmer and …

Thesis Bibliography: The Relationship Between the Military and Media in a Time of War – Three Case Studies (Second World War, Vietnam, Post-September 11 Conflicts) of America in Multi-Year Conflicts

(NOTE: An updated bibliography and account, “How to Write A Graduate Thesis on Military-Media Relations in the USA! in 120 Days” posted April 14, 2011.) Over the next five months, I will dedicate no small part of my time to the task of studying the relationship of the U.S. military and the American media during a time of war. I will examine three case studies of multi-year involvement in foreign conflict from the Second World War and Vietnam era to the present, post-September 11 conflicts. My work will first be collected towards my thesis in the Security Studies program at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. I hope to also see the work evolve into a magazine article. I will amend this list periodically as my bibliography expands. I also hope to collect numerous interviews with current practitioners, editors, communications managers, and military public affairs officers relevant to the study of the relationship between the military and the media as possible between then and now. Historical Rise of the Modern War Correspondent Goldstein, Robert …

Today on Verve Photo: Amanda Rivkin in Azerbaijan

Amanda Rivkin Verve Photo: The New Breed of Documentary Photographers December 13, 2010 Amanda Rivkin (b.1984, USA) is currently based in Brooklyn while completing a master’s degree in security studies: terrorism and sub-state violence at the Georgetown University Graduate School of Foreign Service in Washington, D.C. Previously based in her hometown, Chicago, where she travels frequently, her work has appeared on the front pages of Le Monde, The New York Times, and The Washington Post and Courrier Japan, The Financial Times, Foreign Policy, and The London Sunday Times Magazine. She received a Young Explorers Grant from the Expeditions Council of the National Geographic Society to travel to Azerbaijan, Georgia, and eastern Turkey for a project, “Exploring the Evolving Oil Economy: the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline,” in 2010. She is a graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and Sarah Lawrence College. About the Photograph: “This photo was taken on a beach in the Bibi Heybat section of southern Baku, Azerbaijan on the 4th of July, 2010, the same day Hillary Clinton visited the oil …

Cablegate Continued: The System Is Watching and Other Sordid Tales From the Day’s Affairs of State

Accessing the WikiLeaks site has gotten difficult, if not impossible now despite mirror sites and domain names registered at last check in France, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. However, those that visit the site undoubtedly receive a malware infection pretty fast. Similar tactics took down The Guardian’s website yesterday when it attempted to host a live, online chat with WikiLeaks founder, Interpol fugitive, and known loon, Julian Assange. I hate to ask an obvious question of Mr. Assange, but how does he expect a nation-state, a superpower notably to react? If he gets away with it, so can anyone and the United States of America cannot have that. Joking aside, there is a serious, massive question of what to do with Mr. Assange, how to prosecute him, all the while keeping in mind he may have made himself into a willing martyr of the data revolution and that the U.S. arsenal includes everything from drones to nuclear weapons, neither of which will be used in this case given the strategic predicament. To date, there has been …

FotoWeek DC Georgetown Student Exhibit Opening Tonight (Saturday November 6)

Exhibition – GU Student Exhibition “Multiple Perspectives” DATE: 11/6/2010 – 11/13/2010 WHEN: 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM WHERE: Georgetown University Art Afficianados Walsh Building 2F, 36th & Prospect NW Washington, DC 20057 Hours: 5:00pm-7:00pm View Google Map >> DESCRIPTION: Our exhibition is a collection of thirty digital photographs submitted by undergraduate and graduate students at Georgetown University. The theme is “Multiple Perspectives.” Whose perspective are you representing? We are challenging photographers to interpret this theme either narratively or technically. The three photographs that will published in the Georgetown University Literary Magazine, The Anthem, will be announced at the reception. Exhibit open daily from 5:00 pm to 7 pm Opening reception Saturday, November 6th from 5-7 COST: Free