All posts tagged: fortnight journal

Today in Chicago: Last Cabrini Green High-Rise Demolition Begins

In late 2007 and through early 2008, I spent several months following and photographing the Revolutionary Communists, a group based around the personality of Bob Avakian, a reclusive Armenian-American said last to be living in Paris. At the time, they lived at 1230 N. Burling, the last Cabrini Green high-rise building where demolition will begin today. The photo essay, “Plan for Transformation” borrows its title from the name of the urban renewal scheme devised by Mayor Richard M. Daley and the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) that would see the destruction of some of the largest public housing projects in the nation (at their inception the world) which were built under the leadership and direction of Mayor Richard M. Daley’s father Richard J. Daley during his 21-year tenure as mayor for life. Previously in Fortnight Journal, I wrote in an article entitled “The Chicago Way“: The outcome of the younger Daley’s “Plan for Transformation”–or, more accurately, the demolition of Chicago Housing Authority projects–would hand over large swaths of prime Chicago real estate on the Near North, …

Fortnight Journal: The Chicago Way

The Chicago Way Fortnight Journal February 14, 2011 I. The Chicago Tribune arrived on the ledge outside my family’s kitchen. It was December. I was home for the holidays from graduate school. On the front page, the Tribune featured an early poll of 721 likely voters in the Chicago mayoral race. This was the first real contest in 21 years for the highest office in the city; The Fifth Floor; the mayor’s executive suite at Chicago City Hall. The poll showed a clear and early divide had emerged: There was Rahm Emanuel. And then there was everyone else. Or rather, there was Rahm Emanuel with a double-digit, 32 percent lead, and then a fragmented spread that delegated mere single-digit percentage points to the other six candidates, in alphabetical order: Roland Burris, Gery Chico, Danny Davis, Miguel del Valle, Reverend James Meeks and Carol Moseley Braun. As of this writing, the race has dwindled considerably. Davis and Meeks bowed out and endorsed Moseley Braun, making her the de facto black candidate in the race. Burris announced …

The Year in Pictures 2010: United States, Cuba, Slovakia, Azerbaijan, Turkey and Hungary

The Year in Pictures 2010 by Amanda Rivkin available on PhotoShelter Archive. Images from the year include: Gitmo USA – the prison site designated for Guantanamo Bay detainees after the prison’s closure in rural Illinois that never quite opened because the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay has not yet closed. Portrait of William Fiedler, Owner of the Gallery Bookstore, Chicago – My former boss at one of the North Side’s finest used book stores. Injured Veteran – Portrait of Michael Jernigan, injured in Fallujah, Iraq in 2004; photographed at The Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia. Baltasar Garzon – Former examining magistrate of Spain’s Criminal Court, extraordinarily controversial for execution of the practice of universal justice and far-reaching indictments of foreign leaders and terrorist organizations; photographed at the Instituto Cervantes in Chicago. Afghan Bowling Tournament (3 images) – Afghan-American bowling tournament in Annandale, Virginia. Cuba (8 images) – The Second Age of Castro, published on ForeignPolicy.com and The New York Times “Week in Review”. Spectacular Slovakia (13 images) – Weddings, floods, world cup, trains, planes, castles, …

The Best in WikiLeaks Cablegate Coverage from News Sites Around the World

December 2, 2010: “El ‘antiamericano’ Garzón tuvo especial seguimiento,” El Pais [in Spanish] Published under a headline on the homepage of the website, “El ‘antiamericano’ Baltasar Garzon” – photographs of Baltasar Garzon on Amanda Rivkin PhotoShelter archive. “Mafia Analogy for Aliyev Dynasty: Ilham Aliyev and Corleone Brothers (Wikileaks),” AzeriReport ” In US diplomatic cables newly released by Wikileaks, Aliyev clan’s rule over Azerbaijan is compared to mafia, specifically to the Corleones family in the famous ‘Godfather’ movie series. Ilham Aliyev himself ‘described alternately as a mix of “Michael” and “Sonny.”‘ Maintaining ‘a clever, realistic foreign policy’ that he inherited from his father, he reminds of the cold-calculated alliance builder Michael Corleone. But his domestic policies, with crude retaliation against even minor challenges to his authority and criticism, resemble the ‘brash, impulsive’ Sonny Corleone.” related posts: “Mafia Analogies for the Aliyev Family in WikiLeaks/U.S. State Department Cablegate: Is He Michael or Sonny?” Includes links to relevant background articles and blog posts to understanding the Aliyev/Corleone cable: “Donkey Video,” Emin Milli and Adnan Hajizade/OL! “Shown Trial,” Fortnight …

Mafia Analogies for the Aliyev Family in Wikileaks/U.S. State Department Cablegate: Is He Michael or Sonny?

The ongoing flood of U.S. diplomatic cables released by the online repository of leaked government and corporate documents Wikileaks known as “Cablegate,” has led to the release of a cable from the U.S. Embassy in Baku using a mafia analogy of the Corleones from the popular “Godfather” movie based on the Mario Puzo novel of the same title questioning whether Azerbaijan’s President Ilham Aliyev is like Michael or Sonny and rendering father Heydar essentially Vito. The cable makes two passing referencing to Emin Milli and Adnan Hajizade, released from prison a little less than two weeks ago after serving several months each on trumped up charges of hooliganism most observers said was little more than a ruse following their satiricial video, dubbed the “donkey video”: Commenting on the GOAJ’s harsh reaction to the YouTube “donkey video” (Reftel A), –––– quipped to the Charge that what one must understand about Aliyev, “He’s not Michael Corleone, he’s Sonny.” Recently in Fortnight Journal I wrote of this video in an article entitled, “Shown Trial”: Milli’s great crime against …

Shown Trial: Emin Milli and the Future of Azerbaijan

Shown Trial Fortnight Journal November 26, 2010 What happens to the Vaclav Havels of the world when their velvet becomes bloody? Azerbaijan, after its 2005 push for openness and reform in government, found itself somewhere among Budapest in 1956, Prague in 1968 and Poland in 1981. A human tragedy began; replete with obligatory (in the post-Soviet world) sideshows, show trials, political arrests and imprisonments of intellectuals—followed by their occasional, conditional release. When I met Emin Milli, one such Azeri prisoner of conscience, he was on leave from prison in Azerbaijan this summer for one week to attend his father’s funeral and mourn his passing. He sat with his wife, Leyla, and mother, Natella, in a cousin’s home, surrounded by friends and family in the village of Boyuk Oyrad, in his native Neftcala region of Azerbaijan. Leyla would later remark to Radio Free Europe how unfortunate it was that “someone had to die, so that we may talk.” Among such circles of dissent, history has provided for the emergence of several archetypes. Some dissenters are reluctant …

holiday print sale / fortnight journal / upcoming travel

Another newsletter went out yesterday afternoon: Greetings! A short, personal note before I begin with the usual business. Thank you as always for your continued support of my work. It means a great amount to me these days as I have been struggling a lot to get my feet off the ground since moving to New York a few short months ago. The small gestures of support, kind words regarding my work, and print purchases have meant a great amount to me. Thank you. I am holding an unprecedented holiday print sale in an effort to raise money for my upcoming trip to Hungary to cover the aftermath of the alumina industrial accident in the village of Ajka, which sent a flood of toxic red sludge pouring into the surrounding towns and countryside, marking the country’s worst ecological disaster. For the awesomely low price of $75 each (or $50 for student), I am offering up 17 different prints to choose from as part of this sale. Of course, if you see something you like more, …

The Moment: Turkish Prime Minister Recep Erdogan Throws a Book at My Head

The Moment: Turkish Prime Minister Recep Erdogan Throws a Book at My Head Fortnight Journal November 12, 2010 Erzurum, Turkey on August 13, 2010, 4:04 P.M. I was in Turkey, following the route of the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline from Azerbaijan through Georgia until its end in the mouth of the Mediterranean bay of Yumurtalik, on a Young Explorers Grant from the National Geographic Society. Erzurum, Turkey was by far the most conservative point we had come across along the route. It is the most conservative of Turkish cities in a country where the secular designs of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk prevail. Unlike the rest of Turkey, accommodations regarding principles of faith are scant in Erzurum. Aug. 13 was the third day of Ramadan and almost everyone in the city fasts for the occasion. To eat in Erzurum, we had to inquire in restaurant after restaurant if they would serve us. When they did, they hid us far from the windows where potential customers could not complain and suggest they were un-Islamic for serving a cafir, or infidel—something …

Holiday Print Sale, FotoWeek DC, Fortnight Journal, Turning Point Concludes

Newsletter went out yesterday afternoon: Greetings! I would like to announce a holiday print sale of a select series of 17 prints for $75 each. Every print is from a 6 x 10 inch file and is printed on 8 x 10 inch paper and students who order from a .edu e-mail account receive a discounted price of $50. The holiday print sale is to fundraise for my upcoming trip to Hungary to cover the aftermath of the alumina industrial accident in Ajka that sent toxic red sludge pouring into neighboring villages when an industrial reservoir ruptured. VIEW THE 17 PRINTS FOR $75 to order: send a request that specifies which print and includes your name and mailing address to amanda.rivkin@gmail.com. — Two of my fellow Sarah Lawrence alums, Samantha Hinds and Adam Whitney Nichols, launched Fortnight Journal an online literary journal of art, prose and contemporary culture. VIEW SLOVENSKO FOR FORTNIGHT JOURNAL to see my first of six contributions. — The New York Times Lens Blog “Turning Point” series concluded last week after showcasing …