All posts tagged: btc

Best of 2014: Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Germany and Sweet Home Chicago

(NOTE: Much of my work from this year remains under embargo until publication including my recent work in Bosnia and Herzegovina with National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee Cara Eckholm.) In February, events in Ukraine rapidly spiraled out of control following the peaceful occupation of the central Maidan Niezalezhnosti or Independence Square in Kiev that had begun late in 2013. On the evening of February 18, 2014, the government of Viktor Yanukovych ordered snipers positioned around the square to fire on demonstrators. The gunfire continued intermittently, killing dozens for two days until it stopped. Then Yanukovych fled to Russia. Since then, Russia has annexed Crimea and sent troops into eastern regions of Ukraine. The government in Kiev has realigned itself with the West and the European Union. In early April, I traveled to Kiev to photograph those who had survived the sniper attacks from February 18-20, 2014 and to hear their stories. I hoped to bring their voice into a conversation about the conflict playing out in the international media and policy circles in Washington and …

Top 10 Blog Posts of 2012

The following are the most viewed blog posts on this site over the course of 2012 that were published in 2012: 1. Best of 2012: Azerbaijan and Turkey (430 views) The best images from 2012 include images from Azerbaijan and Turkey. 2. CNN Photos Blog: Bachelor Parties in Prague (198 views) When friends living in Eastern European nations began complaining of noisy, drunken tourists in their historical towns, American photojournalist Amanda Rivkin wanted to dig deeper. 3. Baku Nights (164 views) Women dance on the table at the bar Shakespeare in Baku, Azerbaijan on March 17, 2012. 4. EurasiaNet: Baku Is Bulldozing Its Past (70 views) My images of demolitions and reconstruction in Baku illustrated a story by Ulviyya Asadzade and Khadija Ismayilova entitled, “Azerbaijan: Baku is Bulldozing its Past,” for EurasiaNet (April 27, 2012). 5. British Journal of Photography: VII Photo adds four photographers to Mentor programme (54 views) Photographers Laura El-Tantawy, Nafis Ahmed, Jošt Franko and Amanda Rivkin have been selected to join VII Photo’s Mentor Program 6. Look3 Festival of the Photograph: …

2012 A Year of Transition

2012 was luckily not like 2011, a year that goes down with 1789, 1848, 1917, 1989 as a year of revolution.  By contrast, 2012 was a year of transition in most every respect.  Global technologies, movements, ideas, and politics are all in flux; only the economies of the world remain sluggish, with some notable exceptions.  Turkey is one of these exceptions.  By 2023, the centennial of the modern secular Turkish Republic, the currently ruling Justice and Development Party, AK Party according to its Turkish acronym, hopes that Turkey will be counted among the top 10 economies in the world. (A great BBC Global Business report on what could go wrong is well worth a listen.) After finishing my Fulbright grant in Azerbaijan, photographing Azerbaijani Women, the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline and the Eurovision Song Contest, I moved to Istanbul in September to freelance here in Turkey and the region. I joined the VII Mentor Program where I am working with Ron Haviv on improving my craft for the duration of two years. In this time, I …

National Geographic Explorers Journal: Explorer of the Week – Amanda Rivkin

Explorer of the Week: Amanda Rivkin Posted by Amy Bucci of NG Staff in Explorers Journal on August 14, 2012 This week we are featuring Amanda Rivkin, a photographer who decided to focus her lens on Azerbaijan’s offshore oil fields in the Caspian. Using funds from her Young Explorer grant, she followed the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline’s 1,100-mile route, which skirts five conflict zones in three countries representing believers of both Islam and Christianity. Rivkin’s photos reveal her passion and keen sense of storytelling. As she tells us, “I have come to see photography maybe in the vein of ancient epics, for a good photo is crafted like poetry.” In one National Geographic staff favorite, Rivkin captured a man reclining in a crude oil bath at a spa near Baku. Rivkin’s attention to detail, her knowledge about her subjects, and her unique vision will certainly continue to push her into the spotlight. What project are you working on now? I am transitioning from two long-term projects on the role of women in Azerbaijan and the …

Freelens Magazin #32, 2012: Es gibt immer Überraschungen, Amanda Rivkin: BTC-Öl-Pipeline

Amanda Rivkin BTC-Öl-Pipeline Junge Mädchen bekleiden sich passend für das Freitagsgebet, an dem sie in der Moschee der Altstadt von Baku teilneh- men wollen. Dieses Foto gehört in eine über Emphas.is finanzierte Reportage von Amanda Rivkin. Die Fotografin möchte damit die Veränderungen weiter dokumentieren, die sich durch den Bau der Baku-Tiblisi-Ceyhan-Öl-Pipeline für Aserbaidschan ergeben. Die Leitung spielt eine wichtige Rolle bei der Öff- nung des Landes gen Westen. Amanda Rivkin, kann von einer Basis in Aserbaidschan aus arbeiten. Sie wurde von der National Geographic Society für ein Nachwuchsstipendium ausgezeich- net. Ihre Fotos sind auch in »The Year in Pictures« von der New York Times und von Newsweek abgebildet. “Es gibt immer Überraschungen,” p. 22-23, Freelens Magazin #32, 2012.

Emphas.Is Crowdfunding Goal Met!

Late Monday night Baku time, my Emphas.Is crowdfunding goal to raise $4,250 online to return to the BTC Pipeline route was met! I have enough funds to travel this winter to places and meet people whose lives have been effected by the 1,100 mile transnational oil pipeline route in Azerbaijan, Georgia and Turkey. A great many thanks to all 82 supporters who to date have leant their support to this project! Any additional funds raised now will go to expand the project to include the conflict zones that have helped determine the current pipelines geography and additional costs incurred as a result of this important study on the post-Soviet, post-Cold War reality of international energy commerce. To support the project, please visit my Emphas.Is “BTC Pipeline” project page. Thank you!

Newsletter: Almost half way with 51 days to go! BTC pipeline on Emphas.Is.

“BTC Pipeline” by Amanda Rivkin on Emphas.Is Over one week has passed since I began my efforts to fundraise $4,250 to return to the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) pipeline route this winter, once called the most significant post-Cold War victory as it is the first pipeline to deliver oil and natural gas from a former Soviet Republic to the West whilst bypassing Russia and Iran. At $1,750, I am nearing the halfway point of fundraising but have yet to raise $2,500, which means the goal is very well within reach but still in need of contributions. Rewards for contributors include limited edition books and prints, so please know you will be rewarded as well! Here is the project page: “BTC Pipeline by Amanda Rivkin” on Emphas.Is Direct Link: http://www.emphas.is/web/guest/discoverprojects?projectID=342 To make a contribution, even as little as $10 helps a profound amount, although more is certainly appreciated (and there is a menu of rewards on the top right to inshallah help guide your choices), scroll to the bottom of the page and select “Fund this project!” Then, …

Now on Emphas.Is: BTC Pipeline by Amanda Rivkin (A Crowdfunding Campaign)

Watch this video and consider making a contribution to my ongoing, long-term project, please. There are rewards at every step of the way: For the full project information and pitch on Emphas.Is: BTC oil pipeline I first became interested in the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline in the mid-1990s, when the Clinton White House Special Envoy Bill Richardson and Azerbaijani government were pushing oil companies to build the massive multinational infrastructure project. In the tumultuous post-Cold War period and with the demise of the Soviet Union, major oil companies preferred a more direct and less expensive route through Iran, but American interests prevailed. Oil from the BTC pipeline first reached the port of Ceyhan in southeast Turkey in May of 2006, an event hailed as the greatest geopolitical victory for the West in the aftermath of the Cold War. Since 9/11, however, the same interests that enthusiastically backed the project initially have now shifted their attention elsewhere — towards the Middle East and South Asia. In the summer of 2010, with the assistance of a Young …