All posts tagged: brooklyn

Everyday Projects at Photoville in Brooklyn Bridge Park, Dumbo, Brooklyn

The Everyday Projects Presented by Instagram Featuring Contributing Photographers from @everydayafrica, @everydayasia, @everydayeasterneurope, @everydayegypt, @everydayiran, @everydayjamaica, @everydaylatinamerica, @everydaymiddleeast, and @everydayusa “The Everyday Projects began in post-war Ivory Coast in 2012 when photographer Peter DiCampo and writer Austin Merrill were visiting the country on a magazine assignment. The two had been based in West Africa for many years, and became frustrated by what they considered to be stereotypical media narratives about the region. To present a more representative narrative, they began focusing on moments that felt less extreme and more familiar to the people who lived there. They photographed everyday life with their mobile phones, eventually inviting other photographers on the continent to join them, using a shared Instagram account called @everydayafrica. “Since then, the Everyday concept has become a global phenomenon and 2014 saw photographers around the world adopting the name and launching their own Everyday feeds in their regions. “On Instagram, many of the photographers of The Everyday Projects have established themselves as pioneers, circumventing traditional distribution channels and connecting directly with their audiences, …

From the Archive: The United States of AmeriKitsch

* “Kitsch is the inability to admit that shit exists.” – Milan Kundera Kitsch has the potential to unite all people, irrespective of culture, background, or elitist pretensions. Objects we acquire or accumulate have no meaning until we provide it. The uses for kitsch are infinite. Milan Kundera notes that kitsch is not just the “inability to admit that shit exists,” but also it is the natural aesthetic of all politicians. Last fall in a video interview for Fortnight Journal, I suggested that kitsch might just outlive us all – even the politicians. Yet most moments of pure kitsch happen far away from electoral politics, geopolitics, and the global spotlight. Kitsch injects sentimental into the otherwise mundane. Bob Dylan said “even the President of the United States must have to stand naked,” yet how naked can you be when your person has become part of a larger cult of presidential kitsch? Does kitsch protect? As I prepare to leave the USA for a Fulbright grant to Azerbaijan, I thought it was time to look back …

Postcards from the USA! Images from the Last Week in the USA!

Last week, was a busy one. Rahm Emanuel was inaugurated mayor of Chicago and I graduated from Georgetown University’s Graduate School of Foreign Service. I drove 2,000 miles between here, there and several other places in between. From the corn fields in the plains of the Midwest, to the backyard patios of Brooklyn, to the gates of the highest office in the land. It all ends just before the rapture that was said to end the world but did not manage to. Some postcards from the last week:

In Memoriam: Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington

I am still at a loss for the enormous quantity of injuries to photojournalism in recent months, beginning for this generation with Emilio Morenatti of The Associated Press on August 12, 2009. An Associated Press account of the bomb “planted in the open desert terrain,” according to the American military, left Morenatti without his foot as he traveled in southern Afghanistan near the Pakistani border with AP Television News videographer Andi Jatmiko and a unit of the 5th Stryker Brigade. Again in southern Afghanistan, Joao Silva one of the four founding members of the famous group of South African photographers covering the end of apartheid known as “the Bang Bang club,” was hit by a mine and lost both legs, as reported October 23, 2010 by his employer The New York Times. This spring came the awful and surreal detentions of well known and intrepid New York Times conflict photographers Lynsey Addario and Tyler Hicks alongside reporters Anthony Shadid and Stephen Farrell in Libya. Then obviously and most recently came the tragic deaths a whole …

Today on Verve Photo: Amanda Rivkin in Azerbaijan

Amanda Rivkin Verve Photo: The New Breed of Documentary Photographers December 13, 2010 Amanda Rivkin (b.1984, USA) is currently based in Brooklyn while completing a master’s degree in security studies: terrorism and sub-state violence at the Georgetown University Graduate School of Foreign Service in Washington, D.C. Previously based in her hometown, Chicago, where she travels frequently, her work has appeared on the front pages of Le Monde, The New York Times, and The Washington Post and Courrier Japan, The Financial Times, Foreign Policy, and The London Sunday Times Magazine. She received a Young Explorers Grant from the Expeditions Council of the National Geographic Society to travel to Azerbaijan, Georgia, and eastern Turkey for a project, “Exploring the Evolving Oil Economy: the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline,” in 2010. She is a graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and Sarah Lawrence College. About the Photograph: “This photo was taken on a beach in the Bibi Heybat section of southern Baku, Azerbaijan on the 4th of July, 2010, the same day Hillary Clinton visited the oil …

An Exception to Every Rule: Portrait of a Friend

Normally, I reserve the space of my portfolio and blog for pictures and portraits of anything but those of friends and family. Then there are the exceptions, the time I captured my momka through the glass of a crystal mobile at the Tulip Festival in Holland, Michigan encapsulating her in a perfect heart set off by her pink sweater. Friday came another such chance portrait when my friend Maude Standish found her eye caught by a flicker of mid-morning light beaming through a crack in a makeshift curtain.