All posts tagged: american media

How to Write a Graduate Student Thesis on Military-Media Relations in the USA! in 120 Days

(Plagiarizers, be forewarned mine is already officially submitted to the Georgetown Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and yours will only be an imitation at best and at worst get you in really, really big trouble with the man either now or later in life. See: former German Defense Minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg.) Photojournalists like to create what are called “gear posts” whereby they empty the contents of their backpack and dutifully record each and every item down to the essence and origin of even the lint in the lining (“specially made in Nepal” or “hair from a lamb we slaughtered in Sudan”). I have no intention of doing any such thing, because I imagine most of you would probably be correct to assume that I wear a scarf with a bit of perfume on it (protective against offensive odors), and carry a whole bunch of lenses and batteries (for making pictures and ensuring I do not run out of power in the process), and other things too like cameras, notebooks, water. With that accomplished …

The Bi-Products of Our Labors: Charting Progression Through Progress Charts

This week I hand in my thesis on media-military relations to my adviser, the Georgetown University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Proquest, and hopefully a few people who will be generous enough to edit it before then. As is often the case when you write something longer than 700-800 words, getting people to read something closer to 10,000 words can be a bit tricky. I am not suggesting tools of deception, “psych-ops,” or anything so ordinary as blackmail. Rather, humor and a little prodding. Inspired by the magnanimous work of Bill Mauldin, Second World War cartoonist with the U.S. Army, I created a few cartoons, one of which I am sharing here. Without further ado, some scenes from the war room (gentlemen, no fighting…): In the past two years as a student in the security studies program at Georgetown, I have learned to adjust my own pedagogical background in various ways to a culture where the military dominates. One aspect of this has involved adjusting to methods I never quite understood, such as Power …

A Comment on the Official Comment: The Prosecutor, the Professor and The University

I so seldom have occasion to comment on commenting on official comments. Today is an exception. Inspired by Bob Dylan’s very simple yet eloquent statement that “When something is not right, it’s wrong,” I did something I never do. I commented on a news article, “Updated: Northwestern explains Protess decision, accuses professor of lying, doctoring emails,” in the online comments section. When something is not right, it’s wrong. For the past several months, Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism professor David Protess and the university have triangulated the blame over a series of accusations made as the result of a subpoena against the professor and the program by the State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez. Alvarez charges Protess bolstered students’ grades if their reporting on Anthony McKinney, accused and convicted of killing a security guard in Harvey, Illinois in 1978, revealed prosecutors’ misconduct and reversed his conviction. Later, charges surfaced as well of withholding documents from her office. Among other things, Alvarez sought student grades and notes, otherwise and previously fully protected under an Illinois “reporter shield” …

Thesis Bibliography: The Relationship Between the Military and Media in a Time of War – Three Case Studies (Second World War, Vietnam, Post-September 11 Conflicts) of America in Multi-Year Conflicts

(NOTE: An updated bibliography and account, “How to Write A Graduate Thesis on Military-Media Relations in the USA! in 120 Days” posted April 14, 2011.) Over the next five months, I will dedicate no small part of my time to the task of studying the relationship of the U.S. military and the American media during a time of war. I will examine three case studies of multi-year involvement in foreign conflict from the Second World War and Vietnam era to the present, post-September 11 conflicts. My work will first be collected towards my thesis in the Security Studies program at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. I hope to also see the work evolve into a magazine article. I will amend this list periodically as my bibliography expands. I also hope to collect numerous interviews with current practitioners, editors, communications managers, and military public affairs officers relevant to the study of the relationship between the military and the media as possible between then and now. Historical Rise of the Modern War Correspondent Goldstein, Robert …