All posts filed under: Czech Republic

Top 10 Blog Posts of 2012

The following are the most viewed blog posts on this site over the course of 2012 that were published in 2012: 1. Best of 2012: Azerbaijan and Turkey (430 views) The best images from 2012 include images from Azerbaijan and Turkey. 2. CNN Photos Blog: Bachelor Parties in Prague (198 views) When friends living in Eastern European nations began complaining of noisy, drunken tourists in their historical towns, American photojournalist Amanda Rivkin wanted to dig deeper. 3. Baku Nights (164 views) Women dance on the table at the bar Shakespeare in Baku, Azerbaijan on March 17, 2012. 4. EurasiaNet: Baku Is Bulldozing Its Past (70 views) My images of demolitions and reconstruction in Baku illustrated a story by Ulviyya Asadzade and Khadija Ismayilova entitled, “Azerbaijan: Baku is Bulldozing its Past,” for EurasiaNet (April 27, 2012). 5. British Journal of Photography: VII Photo adds four photographers to Mentor programme (54 views) Photographers Laura El-Tantawy, Nafis Ahmed, Jošt Franko and Amanda Rivkin have been selected to join VII Photo’s Mentor Program 6. Look3 Festival of the Photograph: …

CNN Photos blog: Bachelor Parties in Prague

Bachelor Parties in Prague CNN Photos November 6, 2012 When friends living in Eastern European nations began complaining of noisy, drunken tourists in their historical towns, American photojournalist Amanda Rivkin wanted to dig deeper. In Prague, Czech Republic, Rivkin tagged along for two “stag,” or bachelor, weekends with men from the Netherlands and England celebrating the upcoming marriage of their respective friends. Many of the stag parties hop to different strip clubs set up within a packaged tour. Some of the bars in the city no longer allow stag parties, so they are generally confined to one area of town. It’s a cheap weekend getaway for many Western Europeans. The country’s capital is “one of Europe’s premier tourist destinations,” according to Lonely Planet. Locals appreciate the economic boost, Rivkin said, but they tend to avoid the areas where the stag parties take place. Her friends have told her stories of being assaulted on the streets by groups of drunken men. Rivkin sees Eastern Europe transitioning still from the post-Berlin Wall era, and the stag parties …

Chicago NATO Summit Weekend May 18-22, 2012 Events Calendar

“Afghan Women Shadow Summit” Amnesty in Chicago It’s a crucial time for President Karzai, President Obama, world leaders and the media to see that people care deeply about the fate of women’s and girls’ human rights in Afghanistan. Speakers and panelists include Illinois Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky; Afifa Azim, Executive Director, Afghan Women’s Network; Gayle Lemmon, Council on Foreign Relations and Author, “Dressmaker of Khair Khana”; and Manizha Naderi, Executive Director of Women for Afghan Women. The panel will be moderated by Jerome McDonnell, host of WBEZ’s Worldview. After the Summit, please join us for an action as we fly kites to demand Afghan women’s rights! This event is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required. To register and for more information, please visit http://www.amnestyusa.org/afghanwomen. We need you! When: 11AM – 1PM on May 20th – the first day of the NATO Summit. Registration and light brunch begin at 10AM Where: Swissotel Hotel, Lucerne Ballroom, 323 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60601 Note: After the Summit, please join us at Navy Pier …

The Year in Pictures 2011: Chicago, New York, New Jersey, Czech Republic, Azerbaijan and Turkey

The Year in Pictures 2011 The annus horribilis of 2011 is coming to a close – a year that will go down as one of dramatic upheaval and revolution alongside 1789, 1848, 1917, 1989, and now, this year. In Egypt, young revolutionaries overthrew the government of Hosni Mubarak after 31 years of subservience to a one-party state bolstered by an omnipresent muhabarata, or secret service, further bolstered by an overreaching military, after Egyptians witnessed similar events in Tunisia lead to the removal of that country’s former leader Ben Ali. Consequently, the domino theory made a surprise return as events in Egypt triggered revolts elsewhere in Bahrain, Libya, Syria and Yemen. Of these, only Libya’s leader fell after rebels received aerial support from NATO war planes; Qaddafi was found hiding in a drainage canal near his hometown of Sirte (or Surt, depending on your news source and spelling) and subsequently dragged through the streets, sodomized with a knife and otherwise tormented before being shot in the head. In the Libyan conflict three photographers lost their lives, …

The New Inquiry: Vaclav Havel, 1936-2011

Vaclav Havel, 1936-2011 The New Inquiry December 18, 2011, 5:44PM by Amanda Rivkin Where are the great men? Are we beyond the point of elevating the individual over the group, or are there simply no more individuals? Marc Sageman, a former CIA officer, has warned for more than a decade of the emergence of “leaderless jihad” as terrorist movements spawn violent individuals. But lately his idea has been turned on its head, as the movement for freedom attempts to override the putsch for security. It seems there are no more barriers between the secure, the secured, and the guardians of their security; it is all the same anarchy, brutality, violence, and havoc. There is the elite and then there is everyone else. Enter Vaclav Havel. The words of a Czech man were forwarded to me this afternoon, and they hit me like a cold sheet: “Yep, the last great man.” Every obituary printed today mentions Havel’s achievements: playwright and poet, artist, intellectual, and dissident — but these are titles. More important, he was an inmate …

Bienvenue a Perpignan! / Bienvengut a Perpinya! / Welcome to Perpignan!

They all say the same thing, the first in French, the second in Catalan and lastly English, perhaps the most useless of the languages accept for this week during Visa Pour L’image, as English maintains its credibility as the language of international media still. It is my first trip to the city, to the south of France (previous trips to the country have taken me only to Paris and Bretagne, where my dearest and oldest friend claims deep ancestral roots and where half of her family resides) and to the annual photojournalism festival, likely and perhaps the biggest in the world in its 23rd year. An editor once confided quite privately that the media was so late to catch the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and project images of the destruction of New Orleans worldwide not because President George W. Bush’s response left much to be desired but because the photo editors were on a working vacation in this city, Perpignan in the south of France. In other words, even if you think this annual gathering …